Metatarsalgia

Metatarsalgia denotes a common foot condition characterized by pain and inflammation of the joints and bones of the ball of the foot - the area just before the toes, also called the metatarsal region.

Symptoms of metatarsalgia can develop suddenly, especially after an increase in exercise or high-impact activities, but normally the problems develop over time. Common symptoms of metatarsalgia include:

Sometimes a single factor can trigger metatarsalgia. More often, multiple factors contribute to the pain, including:

Although generally not serious, metatarsalgia can disrupt your day to day activities, and when left untreated can lead to additional pain in your unaffected foot, back or hips. Treatment to eliminate metatarsalgia symptoms can be as simple as resting, icing the affected area and wearing proper-fitting shoes to significantly reduce swelling and ease the pain.

When conservative treatments aren't effective and pain persists, visit our practice for a full exam and a proper diagnosis. In most cases, metatarsalgia can be treated non-surgically. An experienced podiatrist may prescribe specially-designed orthotics or shock-absorbing insoles and arch supports to prevent and minimize future problems with metatarsalgia.

Author
Dr. Jade Gittens

You Might Also Enjoy...

Taking Care of Aging Feet

As we age, our bodies age with us. That includes our feet, which are prone to injury due to their placement on our bodies.

Caring For Arthritic Feet

Arthritis is a joint condition that affects roughly 54 million American adults according to the Arthritis Foundation. It can show up in joints all around the body, including the feet and toes.

What to Do When You Keep Getting Blisters

A foot blister is a small pocket of fluid that forms on the foot. Blisters can be painful while they heal. Foot blisters are caused by several things, including friction, burns, contact with irritants, and autoimmune diseases. Treatment can alleviate your

Treating Bunions

Bunions are most recognizable by the bump or protrusion at the base of the big toe, which may also cause the big toe to slant away from the joint and towards the other toes depending on the size and severity of the bunion.